Services

Jan and Lyn each have specific strengths but also often work together to present a comprehensive package. 

Combined Knowledge-base Combined Competencies
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vanrooyen.info: Knowledge base

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vanrooyen.info: Competencies

You can read more about their individual focus areas by following the links below:

Services provided by Jan

Training & Development: 

As a subject specialist on training and development, combined with his ability to simplify complex issues, Jan can best be described as a “professional” trainer.

You might ask if there is a difference between trainer and a subject specialist.

The difference lies in two areas;

  • A subject specialist is highly experienced and knowledgeable about their subject area.  They might however not always knowledgeable about adult learning and the development of training material and therefore not necessary a good trainer. If they are able to convey the material, they might not be able to do this in other areas.
  • A trainer is knowledgeable and experienced in extracting core subject information and presenting it in the best ways for people to learn. It is therefore less important for them to be subject specialists

Jan has been a trainer researching and presenting courses and workshops for the last 30 years. 

His first exposure was with managing and evaluation of training systems. He then developed a good basis in skills based people development – focussing on “how-to” skills, such as computer software courses.

Jan was subsequently trained as master trainer, carrying co-responsibility for the development of training and facilitation skills of more than 600 trainers and facilitators.  The focus in developing these trainers  was on the how to and why of training.  This was supported by a post graduate degree in Training Management.

His focus expanded into supervisory development, where the focus is usually on tools or techniques that work.  The natural progression was then to Management development where the focus is on understanding the pros and cons of subjects and techniques.

Subsequently, in Executive development, the focus of training was very much on clarifying fundamentals and interrelationships of concepts and issues for buy-in. His move to management and Executive development was supported by his MBA.

Process Facilitation / Consulting:

Process consulting is often understood to have two distinct meanings

  1. Consulting on how to set up or improve business processes. E.g. receiving tender documents, the flow of a manufacturing facility or, setting up an accounting system.
  2. Facilitating, or consulting on, people driven issues.  Examples could include anything from conflict resolution or interpersonal dynamics to facilitating problem solving.

The majority of situations where process consulting is utilised involves disagreements between participants where there is seemingly no solution. In these situations, it usually helps to have a neutral facilitator that allows all perspectives to be aired and considered.

Process consulting can also be used for strategic planning.  This is then not a formalised process of completing multiple exercises, but the strategy is created through group discussions and interaction.

Utilising his in depth knowledge of - and experience in - both Total Quality Management and Business Process Engineering as well as various other techniques such as meditative learning and T-groups, Jan has facilitated many sessions in various forms of process consulting.

Training Material Development:

Every situation and need is different. Although we ensure correctness, comprehensiveness and transferability of information when developing training material, we do not work from a ones-size-fits-all development perspective.  Even if the student material might look similar, the material is designed for delivery in ways that best suit the needs of the situation and group.

As it is extremely difficult to list all materials developed over the past 30 years we will list only a few of the subjects that Jan has developed material on to date.  Please note that the list is not exhaustive and was compiled to give an idea of the breadth of subjects we are able to assist with.

  • IT: (e.g. MS Excel, MS Projects, Email and Email Etiquette, Introduction to personal computing)
  • Training Trainers: (e.g. Instructional Skills, Developing Training Materials and Creativity in learning)
  • Supervisory and Leadership: (e.g. Communication, Fundamentals of leadership and Team leadership, Introduction to management)
  • Management: (e.g. Human Resources -, Marketing -, Project -, Strategic -, Operations -, Knowledge Management, Fundamentals of business and Understanding the business environment)
  • Change: (e.g. Organisation Development, Change transformation and re-engineering, Fundamentals of change management, Total Quality Management and Developing employee surveys)
  • Governance: (Fundamentals and working with boards)

Please feel free to contact us to discuss any training needs your organisation might have.

Organisation Development:

Jan has more than 20 years of experience in Organisation Development - starting from on-the-job based experiential learning to lecturing on Change and Organisation Transformation to MBA level. His experience ranges from transactional changes such as team building and team problem solving, to organisation wide transformational change.

Working with people means that Organisation Development – or people based change - cannot be planned in minute detail. This makes Organizational Development a prime example of process facilitation that can probably best compared to sailing a boat to a specific harbour in constantly adjusting winds.  This affects all departments and all levels of employees, from entry level to executive management and the board, becoming intricately involved and affected. 

External consultants are usually brought in to coordinate and facilitate change processes in line with key people management concepts. Ultimately change processes must be implemented in a way that, at the end, all involved can say “we did it”.  Care must be taken that the consultants do not arrive with pre-set ideas or programmes, as there is no one size fits all approach to organisation development.

Successful change cannot be achieved by a third party implementing pre-packaged processes for and on behalf of an organisation. Successful change requires the buy-in and participation of all members of staff, with special emphasis on the executive management of a company.  Returning to the analogy of sailing a boat, there is no time for sitting on the deck when the winds change. This is specifically true when working with transformational or large scale change.  

Having raised a word of caution about pre-packaged approaches, Jan approaches change interventions with a pre-assessment of the organisation culture. The same process can again be followed post change to monitor the success of interventions.

Organisational Surveys & Culture Assessment:

(Coming soon)

Strategic Planning:

“Develop your senses- especially learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.” (Leonardo da Vinci)

Jan has facilitated strategic planning sessions for numerous organisations ranging from for-profit -, semi-government -, and not-for-profit organisations.  He also facilitates training sessions on the fundamentals of strategic management and has been involved in the audit of health plans at district government level.

A fundamental principle of strategic management is to be able to anticipate, consolidate and be proactive, while maintaining the ability to live with ambiguity and understand that what is planned today might tomorrow be wrong and will need to be changed.  
When crafting a strategy, it is easy to fall into a trap of focussing on exercises, models, or techniques, while it requires the development of systems - and complexity thinking and the ability to “see” strategically. Without strategic thinking, the use of techniques and approaches become mechanistic and often reduce the planning to operational or, at best, tactical plans.  
Strategic management is also not a one day a year exercise ,but a day-to-day process of awareness, consideration, participation and review, involving staff at all levels in an organisation.  
It is from this perspective that Jan has developed different courses for different employee groups.

Program & Process Evaluation:

From pre- and post-testing to impact assessment evaluation should be well planned and executed with transparency and due diligence.

Since starting his training career, Jan has developed evaluation systems for, and evaluated, numerous trainings. By combining his training knowledge, his experience in academic evaluation and his ability to see patterns and relationships, Jan has evaluated numerous business systems.  These range from productivity and performance analysis to probability based and inter departmental comparative evaluations. 

One example of non-training evaluations done include a comparative analysis of strategic planning documents – over a period of time - across various functions within a government department.  A second example required research and the ultimate development of a probability model to predict equipment failure.  A third example involved the development of a communication evaluation system – including a survey - and subsequent inter-departmental analysis to identify possible areas of improvement.

Services provided by Lyn

Project Coordination

Organisations often dream of specific projects for which they may not have the necessary staff capacity. It is often more cost-effective and efficient to contract a consultant that is able to focus specifically on this specific short or medium-term project or programme.

Lyn has extensive experience of managing small and large projects, particularly in the NGO sector.

As project manager of the internationally acclaimed CARIS programme of CABSA, Lyn was responsible for all aspects from the original needs analysis, fundraising, management to eventual closure of the programme 14 years later.

Shorter term projects included acting as local host for the interfaith activities at the International AIDS Conference in Durban in 2016. This included a two day conference for more than 300 participants, an interfaith networking zone in the Global Village, an interfaith worship service, managing the participation of key ecclesiastic dignitaries, et cetera.

Most recently Lyn coordinated an interfaith advocacy campaign on access to paediatric testing and treatment for WCC-EAA.

Research and Analysis

Key components of effective projects are thorough understanding of the context and needs at the start of the programme, and interim and final impact analysis and project reports.

Lyn's analytic and communication abilities enables her to distil the essence from a project and write clear and concise analysis and reports.

She has amongst others been primarily responsible for all CABSA and CARIS project reports, for writing or overseeing annual facilitators reports, and for the publication “Faith Leaders and HIV Stigma Reduction in Africa: Good Practices Collection” for World Association for Christian Communication and Hope for HIV/AIDS International (HFA) available http://cdn.agilitycms.com/wacc-global/Faith-Leaders-2013.pdf

Writing, Content- and Copy Editing

Lyn is fascinated by the use of words and language. Her meticulous research, wide vocabulary and writing skills ensure that factual content is accurate, but also that the 'feeling' content is included and reflected where appropriate. 

She would be happy to assist with the writing and developing of organisational policies, advocacy statements, reports, and even your organisational history in English or Afrikaans.

She recently acted as content editor for a special edition of "Contact", a publication of the World Council of Churches focussing on Health. This special edition focussed on primary healthcare at the 40th anniversary of the Alma Ata declaration.

Training and Facilitation 

Lyn can present a range of workshops - both independently and together with her partner Jan. Workshops include governance, leadership, communication, advocacy, social media etc. You can read more about available training programmes here.

Communication and Social Media for NPOs

Lyn has extensive experience with both social and traditional media in the NPO sector. Social media experience includes currently managing four Facebook pages and three Twitter accounts. In addition to developing communication strategies and managing social media and communication for individuals and NGOs, we can present workshops or one-on-one sessions to assist individuals to manage their own platforms.

Lyn regularly edits documents and publications, and has been involved in recording good practices and designing and developing newsletters (using MailChimp, GraphicMail and other platforms), annual reports and various publications.

Advocacy and Social Justice

Lyn is passionate about justice and has led various advocacy campaigns. She played a key role in re-activating, promoting and supporting the international Thursdays in Black Campaign. She developed an advocacy training programme and has presented it to individuals in grassroots organisations and staff and management of regional organisations. 

Lyn has been actively involved with the work of the World Council of Churches – Ecumenical Advocacy Alliance for many years.

At present she serves on the HIV Strategy Group for the Faith on the Fast Track campaign, and leads a paediatric HIV advocacy campaign in South Africa. She also collaborates on the Common Voice campaign. You can read more about this work here.

Wellness and Stress Management

Lyn's interest in stress and wellness led to a summer school in Behavioral Medicine Applications from the Cape Cod Institute, before she completed her MBA thesis on the topic of Organisational Stress and Individual Personality Type. Lyn presents workshops and guides individuals and organisations to address stress in their context.

Event and Conference Coordination

Lyn for many years coordinated the interfaith activities at the South African AIDS Conference, ICASA, and CABSA conferences and mini-conferences. In 2016 Lyn coordinated the interfaith activities of the International AIDS Conference in Durban, when CABSA acted as the local host organisation. Activities at this event included a three day preconference, an exhibition and networking zone at the global village and the presence and involvement of various high level church leaders.

Constituent Relationship Management

Lyn has developed various organisational databases and processes for interaction and communication with key constituent groups, most recently for We Will Speak Out SA.

HIV Advocacy Campaign

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We dream of healthy children - everywhere!      

Lyn is involved in HIV Advocacy with a specific focus on South Africa, through the World Council of Churches - Ecumenical Advocacy Campaign.

We would like to invite churches, schools, and faith leaders across South Africa to be part of this initiative. As people of faith, we are compelled to speak out against injustice and to make a difference in society. We will continue to add information to this page, and invite your input and participation. If you are interested in being part of this contact Lyn at lyn@vanrooyen.info

Advocacy for Children and Adolescents

Children's Letterwriting Campaign

Champions for Children

Dialogues between Youth and Faith Leaders

Common Voice
1. Advocacy for Children and Adolescents

Your church/school/organisation can help children and young people with HIV.  Together with WCC – EAA, we are involved in a three-month advocacy campaign focusing on South Africa.

UNAIDS estimates that around 1.8 million children younger than 15 are living with HIV in the world.

We know that these children can live a long and healthy life.

It is however essential that they are diagnosed early and that they have medication and Antiretroviral Treatment (ART for the rest of their lives. Sadly, we also know that more than half of children who are born with HIV worldwide will die before their second birthday if they do not receive treatment.

Yet, less than half the children with HIV worldwide received ART in 2017.

Countries worldwide are aiming for the 90/90/90 HIV target - this means that 90% of people living with HIV know their status, that 90% of those who are positive are on antiretroviral therapy, and that 90% of those on treatment’s virus is ‘undetectable’ (this is a sign of successful treatment, and means that the virus is unlikely to be transmitted to others).

South Africa has had good results in reducing new infections in babies and adults (even though there is still concern in some age groups). We are largely also quite successful in achieving the 90/90/90 targets. In 2016, 86% of people with HIV knew their status, 65% of these were on ARVs, and 81% on treatment attained viral suppression.

This success however hides a less rosy picture for children and adolescents, especially for girls.

In South Africa there were 320,000 children living with HIV in 2016, of which 12,000 were newly infected in the year, and 9300 children died from AIDS-related conditions.

While more than 95% of HIV-positive pregnant mothers received treatment in 2016 (this protects their babies from infection and ensure that they stay healthy), only 55% of children living with HIV received ARV treatment. Although the statistics might have strange slightly from then, this means that around 150,000 children do not receive the medicine they desperately need.

One of the most important reasons for this is that children are not diagnosed soon enough, partly because the test in young children is more complex and more difficult to access.

 There is also reason for concern about adolescents.

In 2016 there were 370,000 adolescents (aged 10 to 19) living with HIV in South Africa, of which 150 000 new infections took place in that year alone. Of these new infections, 41,000 took place in young girls. There were also 6 200 deaths due to AIDS-related conditions.

The World Council of Churches - Ecumenical Advocacy Alliance (WCC-EAA) invites faith communities worldwide to be part of an advocacy campaign to address the challenges of HIV diagnosis and treatment in children. This campaign will have a specific intensive focus in South Africa from October to December 2018.

Children's Letterwriting Campaign.

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Useful tools.

Children and young people in schools and churches are invited to be part of an international letter-writing campaign asking for greater access to medication and testing for children. Guidelines are provided to write letter to a few target groups including companies manufacturing medicine and diagnostic equipment, ministers of health, education and finance, etc.

 In this way children can themselves become a voice to increase access to treatment and diagnostics for children and young people.

Although this is an ongoing project we would like to have have the letters by 20 November 2018 so that we can courier them to Geneva for a event on 1 December.

You can also write a letter here.

Tools:

We provide electronic copies of the tools, but they are also available  in hardcopy on request from Lyn.  Please request copies by email.

Champions for Children

People of faith cannot remain indifferent to the 500 children who are newly infected with HIV each day and to the 300 children who die of AIDS-related causes daily. We cannot remain silent knowing that many adolescents do not receive proper information about HIV and AIDS and knowing that all these infections and deaths are entirely avoidable!

To change this situation, the WCC-EAA is mobilizing faith leaders, representatives of faith-based organizations and faith-based media representatives to speak out for and with children and adolescents living with HIV and HIV/TB co-infection. Lyn is acting as a consultunt for the South African campaign

The faith contribution to the Start Free, Stay Free and AIDS Free Framework

This initiative is one of the faith contributions to the Start Free, Stay Free and AIDS Free Framework launched by UNAIDS and PEPFAR in 2016.

We want children to be born free from HIV; children and adolescents to remain free from HIV; and children who are HIV positive to have access to timely testing and quality treatment.

Be a Champion for Children and Adolescents Living with HIV

Champions will inspire political change and inform their faith communities about children and adolescents’ issues related to HIV.

We count on your powerful voices as religious leaders to make and shape national policies, call for justice, protect the rights of children and adolescents, address stigma and discrimination, and mobilize people to take up testing, prevention, treatment and care.

We count on journalists and editors to inform the public about children, adolescents and HIV and raise the level of the debate.

Together, champions will be powerful agents for action to make sure that 1.6 million children and 1.2 million adolescents living with HIV will be provided with treatment by the end of 2018 – as agreed by all United Nations Member States in the Political Declaration 2016 UN HIV High Level Meeting on Ending AIDS.

We are particularly inviting South African faith leaders to be part of this campaign

In many cases the faith voice HIV has become silent. In the country with the largest number of people living with HIV, we need to reinvigorate the faith response.

We would like to invite faith leaders to sign on as champions for children and adolescents living with HIV. We would like to invite you to raise your voice.

What we expect from Champions

champions.jpg
Be a Champion!
Credit: Albin Hillert/WCC

 
 

Champions for Children and Adolescents Living with HIV are asked to support at least one of the following actions:

  • Sign the WCC-EAA Call to Action “Act now for children and adolescents living with HIV” and promote it. (Please also let Lyn know if you have done so)
  • Share information on children, adolescents and HIV within your faith community, including through sermons. Get inspired by the Khutbah and Sermon Guides on children and HIV for Religious Leaders from IMA Health World, INERELA+ Kenya and AIDSFree 
  • Advocate with key decision makers to address paediatric AIDS bottlenecks (government officials; pharmaceutical and generic companies; diagnostic companies, donors) at global level and in your country; and set up meetings with them!
  • Issue a video message on paediatric AIDS testing and treatment for adolescents
  • Organize events to raise awareness about children, adolescents and HIV for instance during occasions such as: Universal TB Day (24 March); Universal Health Day (7 April); Universal Children Day (20 November); Universal Human Rights Day (10 December); World AIDS Day (1 December).
  • Write articles, open editorials for your local or national newspapers, your website, or make a contribution to the WCC Pilgrimage blog and share them with us!
  • Work with radio stations and media outlets, as well as on social media to share all that you do. The WCC-EAA will be honoured to highlight your advocacy actions on the Live the Promise Campaign Facebook page, twitter feed and on the WCC Pilgrimage blog!

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Serious discussions from 2017

We aim to have at least two events in South Africa before the end of November 2018 to equip champions and motivate them for the task. These events will be in Johannesburg and in KZN. Please contact me if you are interested or have any other suggestions. The invitation to these events are available below

Durban - 20 November 2018

Randburg - 30 November 2018

Register for these events here.

To become one of the South African Champion’s for Children and Adolescents Living with HIV, please contact Lyn van Rooyen lyn@vanrooyen.info

Dialogues between Young People and Faith Leaders

Following on the very stimulating dialogues in 2017, dialogue sessions will be held between church leaders and young people in at least two geographic areas. This will create opportunities for young people to share their needs around HIV knowledge and services with faith leaders. If you are interested in being part of a dialogue (presently planned for Gauteng and KZN), please contact Lyn.

Durban - 19 November 2018
Randburg - 29 November 2018

Register for these events here.

2. Common Voice

The AIDS epidemic is at a critical point. A remarkable, decades-long global effort has given us the capability to end AIDS as a public health threat. However, the global political will to end AIDS is weakening, raising the risk of a major resurgence of the epidemic in the 2020s, with tens of millions of lives at stake.

The Common Voice Initiative will reduce the risk through advocacy and action by leaders and followers of a broad range of religious traditions.  We will organize, support, and promote activities that are strongest and most effective when done by religious groups and leaders working collectively.

Our first project is an advocacy video based on the use of the Common Voice pledge in diverse worship settings around the world, essentially a global responsive reading.  If your local religious community would like to participate, please click on the button below.

Access the pledge in English

Participate in the “Common Voice” video​

Download the pledge and video instructions in Afrikaans

Visit the Common Voice Website

Article: 

Gauteng Invitation

Article: 

Letter to Pharmaceutical Company

Introduction and Background

For security reasons you will be required to complete a CAPTHCA in the form of a simple sum - this is to make sure that you are not a robot or a hacker! If you already have the background to the campaign, you can move directly to the letter (click "next page" button at the bottom of the page.)

As a young person, you and your church, school or organisation can help children and young people with HIV. If you already know about the campaign, you can move to the next page (click at the bottom)

UNAIDS estimates that around 1.8 million children younger than 15 are living with HIV in the world - with 500 new infection per day!

We know that these children can live a long and healthy life.

It is however essential that they are diagnosed early and that they have medication and Antiretroviral Treatment (ART for the rest of their lives. Sadly, we also know that more than half of children who are born with HIV worldwide will die before their second birthday if they do not receive treatment.

Yet, less than half the children with HIV worldwide received ART in 2017.

Countries worldwide are aiming for the 90/90/90 HIV target - this means that 90% of people living with HIV know their status, that 90% of those who are positive are on antiretroviral therapy, and that 90% of those on treatment’s virus is ‘undetectable’ (this is a sign of successful treatment, and means that the virus is unlikely to be transmitted to others).

South Africa has had good results in reducing new infections in babies and adults (even though there is still concern in some age groups). We are largely also quite successful in achieving the 90/90/90 targets. In 2016, 86% of people with HIV knew their status, 65% of these were on ARVs, and 81% on treatment attained viral suppression.

This success however hides a less rosy picture for children and adolescents, especially for girls.

In South Africa there were 320,000 children living with HIV in 2016, of which 12,000 were newly infected in the year, and 9300 children died from AIDS-related conditions.

While more than 95% of HIV-positive pregnant mothers received treatment in 2016 (this protects their babies from infection and ensure that they stay healthy), only 55% of children living with HIV received ARV treatment. Although the statistics might have strange slightly from then, this means that around 150,000 children do not receive the medicine they desperately need.
One of the most important reasons for this is that children are not diagnosed soon enough, partly because the test in young children is more complex and more difficult to access.

There is also reason for concern about adolescents.

In 2016 there were 370,000 adolescents (aged 10 to 19) living with HIV in South Africa, of which 150 000 new infections took place in that year alone. Of these new infections, 41,000 took place in young girls. There were also 6 200 deaths due to AIDS-related conditions.

Children and young people in schools, churches and other institutions are invited to be part of an international letter-writing campaign asking for greater access to medication and testing for children. We invite you to be part of this by filling in the form below.

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Customer Feedback

Governance mini-workshop, Centurion:

"It was refreshing and interesting to hear governance from a Christian perspective as well.  It helped to create a better understanding within our context.  Participants were grateful for you and Lyn opening the “murky” field of governance a little bit and giving them some pointers to be more thoughtfully and efficiently involved in their respective Boards.  Thank you once again for coming all the way to us and sharing your knowledge and experiences."